FRIDA Young Feminist Fund

Applications for 2018 are open until March 18th 2018

You can apply for a grant up to $5,000 USD. Grant money is flexible, it can be used over a period of 12 months for general support and/or projects, and are open to renewal.

You do not need to be a legally registered organization to apply.

Priority will be given to:

  • Small, emerging grassroots groups with little or no access to funding from larger donors
  • Groups, networks, or collectives based in Sub Saharan Africa, South, Southeast, East Asia and the Pacific, The Middle East and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean and Central, Southern, Eastern Europe and Central and North Asia)
  • Groups located in remote, underserved areas
  • Groups that are made up of and/or working with socially excluded and disadvantaged young women, trans* and intersex youth, especially: refugees, ethnic, national and caste minorities, rural women, urban disadvantaged, lesbian, bisexual, trans*, women and trans* living with HIV and AIDS, sex workers, women and trans* with disabilities, women and trans* living or working in armed conflicts and post conflict zones, women and trans lead unions, groups working on climate justice, land rights
  • Groups using creative and innovative strategies to further their activism (including art, music, culture, poetry, social media, feminist activist driven research etc

Application Process

Digital Freedom Fund

The Digital Freedom Fund supports strategic litigation on digital rights in Europe through two main activities: 
 
  • Providing financial support for strategic court cases; and 
  • Facilitating collaboration between digital rights actors. 
Where needed, the Fund also assists digital rights actors in finding pro bono legal support to further strengthen their litigation work.
Starting in Q2 2018.

Read more

Knight Prototype Fund: Arts and Technology

How might cultural institutions use technology to connect people to the arts?

Technology can radically advance the way people access and participate in the arts, helping cultural institutions reach people where they are, keep pace with audience preferences and create fresh avenues for creative expression. We are launching this open call for ideas to explore digitally-driven approaches that galleries, museums, performing arts centers, theaters, and arts organizations of all genres might use to inspire audiences.

Knight Foundation will run the call through the Knight Prototype Fund, which helps people quickly develop and test early-stage ideas. We recognize that no single solution fits all contexts and communities. Our goal is to accelerate technology development in the arts, learn from experiments and share lessons with the field.

Applicants don’t necessarily have to work for an organization. We’re looking for ideas from arts organizations, artists, technologists, designers, educators, researchers and others inside or outside of institutions who are eager to experiment. We’re open to diverse approaches and perspectives on the use of technology to connect people to the arts, and seek to identify projects that have the potential to be replicated by others in the field.

We expect to award a share of up to $1 million with an average grant size of $50,000. In addition to funding, grantees will also benefit from training in innovation methods and opportunities to learn from others in the group. The deadline to submit your idea is 11:59 p.m. EST on March 6, 2018. Winners will be announced in May 2018.

If you have questions, attend our office hours from 1 to 2 p.m. ET Feb. 21. Join here.

Update Feb. 21, 2018: If you missed our office hours session, check out a recording to get your questions answered.

Apply

https://www.knightfoundation.org/challenges/knight-prototype-fund/

U.S. based individuals or organizations (both nonprofit and for-profit) may apply.

Mozilla Research Grants

Mozilla is dedicated to keeping the web open, healthy, and accessible to everyone. As part of that mission, they provide research grants to universities, labs and research-focused registered non-profits working to make the internet a better place.

Research Domains

We fund research in a wide variety of ways, including building new technologies, improving existing technologies, and studying how people use technology. Our research domains include Emerging Technologies’ four core areas:

  • Open Web Platform, such as Rust, Servo and Daala. We recently funded projects testing the Rust and bindgen compilers, and implementing Typed WebAssembly.
  • Mixed Reality, including virtual reality and augmented reality. In 2017 we funded a study into gender differences in virtual reality, and another exploring how to design pro-social norms in VR.
  • Speech, Language & Assistants: recent funded research includes improvements to word2vec; aiding the creation of a corpus of human-chatbot interaction open data; and mining translations from existing webpages.
  • New Explorations: We have funded proposals to design more usable IoT access controls; family use of IoT; and building distributed computing in remote islands

We also fund research relevant to Mozilla in other ways:

  • Firefox: We funded a study to understand how users think Private Browsing modes work and how they actually work, as well as a study exploring older adults’ use of the internet.
  • Internet Health: Funded proposals have included studies of the ethics of hacktivism and evaluating add-ons to understand their privacy implications.
  • Accessibility: We have funded the creation of a corpus of unambiguous data for evaluating text entry for blind users, as well as tools to improve privacy and accessibility of web extensions.
  • Inclusion: We believe in the value of inclusive innovation and impact, continuously exploring new possibilities with and for diverse communities, and have funded projects that include studying ways to ameliorate harassment in streaming video and encouraging computer science education for youth.

In addition, we’re always interested in projects that explore answers to difficult questions impacting the open web, such as:

  • Developing open data resources and allowing for data portability
  • Exploring reasonable ways to balance advertising and privacy
  • Improving web anonymity
  • Developing open identity solutions and open standards for encrypted messaging
  • Researching alternatives to advertising to fund internet experiences
  • Finding ways to improve the decentralization of the internet away from closed-source software and closed-source data
  • Exploring issues related to vulnerable populations, and improving diversity in open-source software

For more detail, here are the previous funding announcements:

While we do fund a wide variety of domains, this program is for funding research.

Submitting a Funding Request

UPDATE: Submissions for 2017H2 are now closed. We will announce the 2018H1 program in Spring 2018. To be notified about these or related opportunities for collaboration or funding, join this mailing list.

Applications must be affiliated with a university, research institute or research-focused registered non-profit, in any country (except for those embargoed by the US State Department). University-affiliated applicants can be students or faculty; students will require a letter from their advisor. We encourage the submission of small, focused proposals, and we expect the timescale for most projects, not counting final publications, will be around one year. In general, we cap individual grants at $50,000. As part of our commitment to diversity, we will fund childcare up to 10% of a grant, with a cap of $5000, not counted as part of the $50,000 cap. We particularly encourage applications from new faculty in their first or second years. Funding is given as an unrestricted gift to the institution. We do not pay university overhead.

Proposals must include a plan for disseminating the results, which would normally include publication in a peer-reviewed and open-access venue, and we encourage you to make any resulting publications, results, code, and/or data publicly accessible. We will pay open-access fees for not-for-profit publishers included in your budget. In the interests of transparency, we ask you to acknowledge Mozilla’s support in your publication, and send it to us when it gets published. We particularly encourage grant recipients to further publish their work in a format more accessible to the public, like blog posts or articles in the popular press.

Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation for the Progress of Humankind

The Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation for the Progress of Humankind (fph) is a foundation under Swiss law. Our aim is to contribute to the emergence of a global community. Our work focuses on governance, ethics and sustainable living modes.

In 2015-2025, in the continuity of the previous period, the action of the foundation is structured into four areas focusing on:

  • lifestyles and socio-economic organization in a post-consumerist perspective: Transition to sustainable societies;
  • regional cooperation in a multipolar world, and the necessary legitimate governance to gain the support of the people: legitimate governance and regional cooperation;
  • liability and responsibility from a socio-professional perspective: Responsibility and Ethics;
  • information for social change: Methods and tools for information and dissemination of ideas.

How to apply for funding

A funding application should include the following elements:

  • a description of the stakes considered and their relevance in regard of the three themes: governance, common ethics, and sustainable society,
  • the state of the art of the various stakeholders already involved in the field, their aims, and strategy. It is essential that applicants demonstrate a great insight of the environment they pretend to influence,
  • a description of the strategy proposed that has to be relevant in regard of the above overview. It is important to show how this strategy might influence and modify the existing state of play.
  • a description of the necessary human, intellectual and financial resources to successfully implement the strategy.

Read more

http://www.fph.ch/

The french version of the website is much more complete.

FundAction

FundAction is a new participatory fund making grants for social transformation, organized around a community of activists based in Europe to support social movements working towards a transition to a just and equitable world.

Three kind of grants are being proposed: Renew, Rethink, Resist.

Renew

Support for new initiatives and ideas that promote systemic change. Open to: Everyone / Funding up to: 20.000 €

Rethink

Creating a European network and community through funds for collaboration, exchange and capacity building. Open to: Members / Funding up to: 5.000 €

Resist

Rapid funding to respond to urgent actions. Open to: Everyone / Will be launched in 2018

Read more

https://www.fundaction.eu/

Guerilla foundation grants for societal transformations

True to THEIR name, the Guerrilla Foundation helps activists & grassroots movements build pockets of resistance, that will contribute to larger societal transformations toward a living, circular economy with a deeply democratic society that prioritises social & ecological wellbeing.

Programme Objectives and Focus Areas

While the Movement & Backbone objectives, focus on our core grant-making activities, the Voice objective is more directed at how and what we communicate as well as the overall radical, systemic change narrative we want to help bring about.

1. THE MOVEMENT – Fund for Grassroots Movements

  • Fund bold campaigns that mobilise individuals through creative means.
  • Fund movement organisations and activists that are central in tackling big issues and have a systemic change perspective.
  • Via two closed calls per year, one in spring and one in autumn.

2.  THE BACKBONE – Fund for Activism Structures

  • Support organisations and activities that educate & build capacity for community organisation and mobilisation, develop skills and thus boost credibility of activists, collectives or associations (e.g. online infrastructure, educational programs).
  • Support activist platforms  and  effective ways for activists/citizens/stakeholders to connect and organize.
  • Fund organisations that help create stronger connections between grassroots and top-tier change efforts (e.g. lobbying etc.) to increase the legitimacy of the latter.
  • Via two closed calls per year, one in spring and one in autumn.

3. THE REFLEX – ‘Go Guerrilla’ Fund for Urgent Actions

  • Respond to the need for urgent mobilisation and actions (e.g. protests) that react swiftly to emerging and unexpected sociopolitical situations and emergencies affecting activists.
  • Cover immediate needs of activists (e.g. legal support, meeting/convening costs, mobilisation costs).
  • Grants up to 5,000 EUR
  • Ongoing, year-round. Contact us at hello@guerrillafoundation.org and we’ll get the ball rolling.

4. THE VOICE – Mission for Re-articulating Distorted Narratives

  • Promote the idea and practice of grassroots mobilisation and coordinated pan-European collective action.
  • Move past narrow theories of change that are unsuitable for systemic change efforts. Our impact definition acknowledges and promotes the role of movements in shaping values and cultural narratives.
  • Share data, publish failures & not overstate impact to stop perpetuating unrealistic narratives and false expectations to advance the sector pragmatically.
  • Develop and promote good practices for effective philanthropy to educate & inspire the next generation of progressive, engaged grant-makers.

Target Groups

  • Grassroots organisations that organise and mobilise individuals, particularly those from marginalised backgrounds.
  • Movement organisations with a collaborative pan-European orientation particularly those that are addressing relevant issues from a systemic perspective.
  • Individual activists that are central to a specific movement and want to implement a relevant project beyond organisational borders.
  • Organisations and projects that provide structures for learning, communicating, organising & mobilising – online and offline.

What we are NOT Funding

  • Primarily artistic or academic projects (even if they relate to social movements / activism).
  • For-profit efforts.
  • Religious organisations and political parties.
  • Re-granting organisations.
  • Government programmes.

Selection Criteria

In the first step of the selection process, the Guerrilla Foundation team will seek out relevant organisations that work on issues that interest us and are currently important. These are the criteria that they will use (for both the Closed Calls and Urgent Action Fund) to differentiate between these relevant organisations:

Systemic Perspective – Is the project addressing root causes? Is it working towards systemic change, moving away from the symptomatic approach to a more holistic framework? Sustained action on achieving a core mission as opposed to one-off activities.

Catalytic – Bold and promising early stage initiatives. And/or initiatives that have a tough time finding funds elsewhere. How important is what we have to offer for this organisation?

Embodiment of Progressive Values  Does the organisation promote and embody the progressive values of equity, fairness, non-violence, democracy, and sustainability?

Absorption Potential – Financial & management ability, size of grant in relation to overall project/programme/organisation budget, stable organisation with low turnover & capable staff.

Multiplier Effect – Is there the potential to create large impact on an issue, field or network of organisations? How effective and creative is this organisation/individual at communication of its impact, ideas etc How central and/or collaborative within the ecosystem is this organisation/individual?

Read more

http://guerrillafoundation.org/

Edge Fund grants for long term societal change

Funding Criteria

Edge Fund supports those taking action for a just, equitable and sustainable world. We fund work that challenges abuses of power and aims to bring an end to the systems that cause injustice. This could be our economic system, our political system or any system that discriminates against people based on their identity or background (e.g. class, ability, gender, race, nationality, religion, sexuality, age or other factors).

What we fund:

  • Work that creates long-term change in society by addressing the causes of injustice and inequality.
  • Work addressing issues facing a particular community that is led by that community (e.g. a group working on issues around sex work should be led by people with direct lived experience of sex work).
  • Groups based in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England.
  • We fund small groups that struggle to get funding elsewhere, particularly if other funders might consider them to be too radical. The average income of groups we fund is around £2500. If you’ve received funding from mainstream sources, such as the Lottery or local council, or have several paid staff, we’re probably not the fund for you.
  • We fund all types of non-profit organisations, including groups that are not formally registered.
  • Groups who have a religious purpose are welcome to apply but we don’t provide financial support for any activity, initiative or project where the primary aim is to promote religion.

What we do not fund:

  • We do not fund traditional charity work that only addresses symptoms of injustice and inequality without aiming to tackle the root causes. So, for example, we would not support activities that only improve health and well-being, or relieve financial hardship and unemployment, or improve social inclusion and harmony, or conserve the environment, or advance education and training. More on charitable activity and more on change vs charity.
  • We do not fund groups with an annual income over £25,000.
  • We do not fund commercial or business activity.
  • We rarely support registered charities, community interest companies or social enterprises as they usually have more funding options than other types of groups, and do not have radical aims. If you are unsure, please get in touch to ask us if you are eligible before applying.
  • We do not support international groups or issues. Groups in the UK & RoI that are targeting a UK & RoI-based target in response to an injustice outside the UK & RoI can apply. For example, we would fund a group of environmentalists within the areas we cover, targeting an company based in the UK & RoI for their crimes abroad. We would not fund a group in a country outside the UK & RoI, targeting a company in the UK or RoI.
  • We do not support political parties.
  • We are not currently accepting applications from individuals. We suggest that you find a few like-minded people and create a group for your project.
  • We do not fund work that is in partnership with, or promotes, the military or police.
  • We do not fund the ‘service user’ groups of larger charities. These charities usually have enough access to funding.

Still unsure?

Read more

Apply here

Amplify Change Strengthening Grant

Strengthening grants support particular, usually time-limited, projects (usually 6-24 months) that seek to engage and contribute to bringing about change in one or more of the priority themes of AmplifyChange.

Strengthening grants range from EUR40,000 – EUR100,000.

We receive strong competition for Strengthening grants. Therefore, we encourage applicants to provide realistic budgets to match their proposed approach, and not just apply for the maximum amount available.

We will not consider grants exceeding EUR100,000 in budget.

There may be a possibility of extending the period of support. This will be advised at a later date to successful applicants, and will be subject to performance.   

Who and what are Strengthening grants for?

Strengthening grants are intended to do what their name suggests – to support and strengthen the work of small to medium civil society organisations, partnerships and coalitions who are operating at a local, community, district or national level.

Strengthening grants are also intended to help strengthen the organisational and technical capacity of groups; we understand that this enables groups to better implement projects that are aiming to secure specific change.  

See eligible countries.

What was the last Strengthening grant call for?

The last Strengthening grant call focused on supporting the advocacy efforts of civil society organisations seeking to bring about positive policy and reform in AmplifyChange priority thematic areas.  

We can provide support to cover costs related to:
  • Implementing specific activities in line with one or more of the AmplifyChange thematic areas
  • Staff costs including support staff
  • Technical assistance costs
  • Travel costs associated with the project objectives and activities
  • Organisational capacity building and strengthening support including staff training and development
  • Activity Monitoring & Evaluation costs
  • Indirect project support costs. These are expenses which are incurred in the support of operational activities including, for example, rent, shared utility costs and audit fees.

Read more & Apply

https://amplifychange.org/grant-model/strengthening/how-to-apply/

Lush Charity Pot

The Lush Charity Pot supports small, grassroots organisations around the world that are working in the areas of animal protection, the environment , and human rights. The majority of our funding is allocated to smaller groups who struggle to find funding elsewhere.

All applications within these fields will be considered irrespective of their geographical location or how the organisation is registered. For a full version of these guidelines, please go to https://uk.lush.com/article/lush-charity-pot-uk-full-guidelines.​ Please read these before downloading the application form.

How much can I apply for?

Our support ranges from a few hundred pounds to a maximum of £10,000 per project. Our average grant is around £4,000.

What projects are funded?

Lush Charity Pot particularly looks for projects that create long-term change. They feel it is also crucially important to fund projects that aim to stop the abuse from happening in the first place by addressing the root cause of the problem; for example, Lush Charity Pot would prefer to fund a project that aims to stop deforestation (eg by challenging the palm oil industry) over one that aims to plant trees to restore an area that’s already been deforested. Lush Charity Pot therefore prioritises funding to projects which aim to change opinion and behaviour through raising awareness of issues, activism, education and campaigning, particularly because this kind of work is not well funded elsewhere. We’re looking for initiatives that reach beyond those directly involved in the project; those that have the potential to benefit many rather than just a few individuals.

We do also fund projects that provide aid and support where needed, such as animal shelters and refugee support and advice groups. As well as challenging harmful practices it’s important to support positive alternatives. Therefore, we also look for projects that promote and implement viable, fair and sustainable solutions to the world’s problems.

Which organisations are fundable?

The majority of our funding is allocated to small, grassroots groups that are often best placed to make a real difference with limited resources and often struggle to find funding. Almost all the groups we fund have annual incomes of less than £250,000 and most are substantially smaller than this and run entirely or predominantly by volunteers. If your organisation is in the fortunate position of having many supporters and corporate sponsors or is able to secure mainstream funding such as government grants, you’re probably not one for us.

We believe we can make the most impact by funding causes that are often overlooked by other funders, therefore we give priority to less popular issues which are more difficult to raise funds for. The most popular causes tend to be health charities (medical research, hospices etc), social welfare, religious causes, children/ young people and military related causes, so these aren’t a priority for us. We’re looking for organisations that take on issues that others don’t, those that push the boundaries and challenge mainstream opinion.

We support non-violent direct action groups because we feel it plays an important part in bringing about social change. Non-violent direct action includes protests and demonstrations, non-cooperation and other non-violent interventions. We will only consider supporting non-violent direct action groups, i.e. those which have no intention of physically harming others or threatening to do so. Whilst we support groups that engage in non-violent direct action in various ways, we do not fund actions that may break the law.

We don’t fund religious organisations, schools, councils, student expeditions or academic studies neither do we contribute to sponsored walks or other fundraising initiatives or sponsor events.

Read more

https://uk.lush.com/article/charity-pot-funding-guidelines

Urgent Action Fund – Africa

Urgent Action Fund-Africa provides financial support for strategic interventions that take advantage of opportunities to advance women’s human rights. Such opportunities arise when an unexpected event – positive or negative – creates a situation in which rapid intervention can have a significant impact.

Urgent Action Fund-Africa makes grants in five categories:

  • Defending the defenders
    UAF-Africa provides urgent financial and technical support for the protection of women’s rights activists who are persecuted as a direct result of their activism. We recognise and support women’s rights activists and organisations whose lives are at risk because of their work in challenging patriarchy, fundamentalisms, harmful traditional norms and values or any other contextual factors that impact negatively on women’s rights or seek to subjugate women. Realizing that many women’s rights activists defend women’s rights in their individual capacities; to defend their own rights or the rights of other women, without necessarily being members of women’s rights groups or organisations, UAF-Africa supports women’s rights activists who, through their individual actions, can have an impact on the collective advancement and protection of women’s human rights.
  • Protecting women’s individual dignity, safety and autonomy
    Women have the right to dignified and secure existence in a world free from physical, sexual, psychological and economic harm where they can determine how to conduct and exercise their bodily, sexual and reproductive rights in private or public spaces, during peace time and in situations of armed conflicts or political volatile situations. UAF-Africa supports women’s rights organisations and women’s human rights defenders (this includes female identifying transgender persons, lesbians, bisexual and intersex persons) to advocate for and safeguard their rights to bodily integrity, autonomy, safety and dignity.
  • Justice and the rule of law UAF-Africa recognises that legal frameworks and the rule of law are important tools for advancing and promoting women’s rights. Access to justice and the practice and implementation of the rule of law have contributed to women’s marginalization and secondary position in society owing to corruption, patriarchy, poor legal and social structures for justice including relaxed enforcement mechanisms. UAF-Africa supports women’s human rights defenders and organisations to engage in, challenge and influence processes that lead to the enforcement of justice and rule of law. This includes precedent setting legal and legislative interventions, review, enactment and implementation of progressive laws, challenging retrogressive laws, interpretation and introduction of progressive legal clauses which all ultimately strengthen the women’s voice and visibility while creating long-lasting and systemic change.
  • Economic JusticeThe reality of today’s world is that the imbalances of power in the economic realm ultimately transpose to imbalanced systems and structures in other spheres. Women’s socio-political, environmental and legal welfare are hinged on access to economic resources. The right to acquire and utilise resources including land, minerals, water and energy for economic gains has been indiscriminately applied to women in Africa. This has contributed to their disempowerment in various realms. Access to employment and increased and equal opportunities within the labor market are key drivers of gender equality. This is particularly relevant as the economic importance of the natural resource sector and within the extractive industry is growing in many African countries. However, the impacts of extractive operations are not gender neutral with women being the first to bear the negative impact of irresponsible extraction practices. The exploitative and ecologically destructive nature of the extractive industry leaves women in particularly vulnerable in many socio-economic and security fronts at the disregard of the multinational companies and state actors involved in the industry.

    UAF-Africa supports women’s human rights organisations and activists who seek to address and overcome the defining factors that contribute to women’s economic stagnation and advocate for an enabling environment with just and equitable frameworks that promote women’s economic self-reliance.

  •  Natural Resource Governance & Climate Change
    Natural resource governance, climate change and social justice interact in a circular fashion and at the heart of this are women’s rights. Women are critical to the management of and control of natural resources. Women are equally pivotal in climate change adaptation and mitigation processes because of their overwhelmingly close relationship with natural resources but also because of the knowledge, skills with regard to adaptation and environmentally friendly production of natural resource outputs.

    UAF-Africa supports women’s rights organisations and women’s rights activists to advocate for their active participation and decision making in the governance of natural resources and the orientation and implementation of climate change policies and practices.

Applications are possible in English, Swahili, Portuguese, Arabic, French.

Read more

RAPID RESPONSE GRANTMAKING

APPLY FOR A GRANT

Mama Cash – Grants for feminist women and trans groups

Mama Cash supports groups and initiatives that:

  1. Work from a feminist and/or women’s rights perspective Example: A group working on women and housing puts the particular experiences of women at the core of its work and therefore is able to speak about the ways in which the barriers women face in accessing decent and affordable housing are different from the barriers men face. They also speak to the challenges of different groups of women (e.g. urban women and rural women) in accessing housing. They are able to explain how these challenges to accessing decent and affordable housing relate to the economic policies being implemented in their country.  Finally, the solutions that they propose integrate all these elements.
  2. Are self-led by the women, girls and/or trans* people they serve Example: If a group is working on trans* rights, it should be trans* people deciding about the groups’ policies, activities and how their money should be spent. The spokespersons for the group should be trans*, as well as those being paid. Non-trans* or cis people can also work for the group in different capacities providing they are not the ones leading it.
  3. Have the promotion of women’s, girls’ and/or trans* people’s human rights as their primary mission, and not just as the focus of part of their programmes Example: An organisation advocating for girls’ access to reproductive health services and whose mission states: To ensure the fulfilment of the sexual and reproductive rights of girls.
  4. Push for structural and fundamental change Example: An Indigenous women’s group provides health services to other Indigenous women in order to respond to their immediate needs in the short-term. But the group also works to tackle the fundamental barriers to accessing such services so that other Indigenous women they can’t or don’t reach can also benefit in the longer-term.
  5. Focus on issues that are under-addressed and/or contested Example: In an environment where governments and NGOs are heavily investing in addressing HIV and AIDS in women of reproductive age, a group of post-menopausal women living with HIV and AIDS organise for their rights and try to make their concerns heard when they are not considered important or urgent in their context.

Mama Cash prioritises groups and initiatives that:

Have an annual budget below 200,000 euros

Mama Cash may partner with larger groups through the Accompaniment portfolio (formerly known as our Strategic Partnerships Portfolio) but will not prioritise providing financial support to them through our thematic portfolios (Body, Money and/or Voice)

Do you want to see examples of the kind of groups Mama Cash supports? click here >>

B. Who & What does Mama Cash support?

Mama Cash makes grants in most countries of the world. Even though contexts are significantly different, we have found that the concerns of some specific groups of women, girls and trans* people tend to be unaddressed and/or contested in most societies (and social movements). So these groups are often found among our grantees.

Mama Cash focuses on three broad thematic areas – Body, Money and Voice – and supports groups whose work falls within them (for further information, see here).

For example, Mama Cash supports groups that work on:

  • Forced sterilisation of women living with HIV and AIDS
  • Exclusion of Indigenous women from decision making over their land
  • Labour rights of women and trans* people in sex, domestic or industrial work
  • Rights to water, food, and a clean, safe, and healthy environment
  • Confronting legal and social discrimination against lesbian and bisexual women, or against migrant and refugee women
  • Sexual rights of women, girls and trans* persons living with disabilities
  • Decision-making for girls and older women (65+) about their lives (education, health, relationships)
  • Political and public participation for women, girls or trans* persons from ethnic or religious minorities

This list is merely indicative. Mama Cash is open to supporting groups organising on other issues that are relevant for their context and have not been mentioned, provided they meet the criteria.

C. What Mama Cash does not fund

  1. Groups whose mission and/or primary focus are not the promotion of women’s, girls’ or trans* people’s human rights
  2. Groups whose work focuses primarily on improving the lives of individual women, girls and/or trans* people without addressing the conditions that give rise to the injustices they face
  3. Groups that actively seek to deny the rights of certain women, girls and trans* people, based on who they are or on their position in society
  4. Groups whose primary purpose is development work, humanitarian assistance, poverty alleviation, or services, such as:
  5. Income-generating activities and credit programmes, (In)formal education, literacy programmes and traditional skills training, Providing social, legal or health care services
  6. Groups led by men (with the exception of those led by trans men)
  7. Groups based in the United States or Canada
  8. Groups based in the Global North that are executing programmes in or are leading partnerships with groups based in the Global South and East
  9. Groups founded by, led by, or structurally or economically dependent on political parties, government agencies, or religious institutions
  10. Businesses
  11. Individuals
  12. Academic research or scholarships
  13. Stand-alone travel grants (costs for travel can, however, be part of broader applications provided they are consistent with the group’s mission and strategies)

Read more

http://www.mamacash.org/apply-for-a-grant-2/womens-girls-and-trans-groups/our-priorities-and-themes/

Mediterranean Women’s fund

The Mediterranean Women’s Fund tries to finance projects of women’s rights associations in Algeria, France, Turkey, Morocco and in Palestine.

MISSION

To provide, or help to find, the financial or technical means which are needed to fund actions decided by those groups, associations, organizations or individuals who are working towards equality between women and men in the Mediterranean region.

PROGRAM TO REINFORCE THE FUND-RAISING CAPACITIES OF ASSOCIATIONS

The Fund has three main axes of support:

  • Networking at a regional level: network building, exchange of information and experiences, project coordination
  • Strengthening of women’s movements at a local level: Support for the running of associations, training for young women and assistance for creative or sensitive projects
  • And depending on the context, individual support:  help for participating at meetings or urgent aid

It provides support to associations and networks of the Mediterranean region by:

  • Providing information concerning funders who work in the region
  • Encouraging members of associations to participate in training programs for project construction, financial budget management and fund-raising
  • Helping the creation of local funds

Criteria

http://www.medwomensfund.org/Documents/en/CriteriaMedWomenFund.pdf

Read more

http://www.medwomensfund.org/en/Initiatives.html#financing

TANDEM Europe

The system is broken and rather than fixing it, we propose changing it.

We observe that our societies in Europe and beyond become more and more fragmented, alienated, radicalised and unjust. Symptoms include the rise of populist and fascist leaders, elites accumulating more power and wealth while many do not benefit from increasing welfare levels, climate change reaching one point-of-no-return after another, scientific facts are labelled ‘fake news’, and meanwhile the arts and cultural practice receive less and less public funding. The system is broken and rather than fixing it, we propose changing it.

We believe that new initiatives are important creators of social good. By connecting them across European borders we support meaningful change.

For one year, 24 cultural organisations and creative initiatives from all 28 EU member states, as well as the Western Balkans, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, will form 12 cross-border collaborative Tandems. In October 2017, up to 40 project managers and/or creative project coordinators will join the Tandem Partner Forum where they can form a European partnership with another Tandem candidate organisation of their choice. After the Partner Forum, a jury will select the 12 most promising Tandem proposals for participation in the main programme phase.

Throughout the following year, selected participants realise a 2-week work placement at their new Tandem partner organisation. During their vocational visit, Tandem participants become directly involved with their partners’ organisational working environment and get hands-on insights into local socio-economic and cultural realities. Spending two mutual placement weeks together on site will provide participants with the necessary shared working time for co-designing, testing and realising their pilot collaboration initiatives. Each Tandem will receive modest start-up funding (€ 5000) for bringing their cultural innovation idea to life.

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Tandem Europe II: application closed

 

European Cultural Foundation – STEP Travel Grant

STEP stands for ‘Supporting Travel for Engaged Partnerships’.

STEP travel grants support creative and critical individual cultural workers who are travelling across Europe and neighbouring countries, to help foster a society with greater solidarity, equality and a stronger sense of social justice.

We support culturally active and engaged individuals for international return travels within Europe or to/from its neighbouring countries to a partner organisation for a professional cultural collaboration that serves a wider community.

The programme is initiated and managed by the European Cultural Foundation (ECF) with the generous financial support of Compagnia di San Paolo.

200-600 EUR per travel.

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http://steptravelgrants.eu

Apply: http://ecflabs.org/drupal/sites/www.ecflabs.org/files/step-beyond-grant/STEP_travel_grants_guidelines_2017.pdf