Tor Summer of Privacy

Back in 2014, the Torproject ran Tor Summer of Privacy, a chance for developers to contribute code and help make Tor even stronger. Each coder was paired a core Tor developer who mentored them, provided guidance and encouragement, and helped with rubber-duck debugging.

This year, in order to encourage developers to contribute to the world’s strongest privacy tool, the Torproject is running Summer of Privacy again! The program is open to anyone, but the mentorship opportunities make it an especially good fit for students. After our Outreachy internships, this is the second paid opportunity to get involved with Tor so far this year.

Use Your Skills 

The Torproject has a handful of projects in mind for this year. The volunteer page has full details — there are projects covering almost every part of Tor, from creating a Tor client in Python to stripping metadata from file uploads in Tor Browser. If none of these projects jump out at you — get in touch and propose your own! If your project idea is accepted, the Torproject will mentor you and help bring it to life.

Tor’s Summer of Privacy program matches Google’s Summer of Code student stipends.

Applying

Applying for the Tor Summer of Privacy is as easy as sending a project proposal to the Summer of Privacy mailing list. If you’re looking for an idea of what proposals should look like, see these examples of GSOC projects from previous years.  The application phase officially begins on March 12th and ends on March 26th. The Torproject will announce the successful applications on April 20th.

Read original post on Torproject’s blog.

Call No.4 for Web Residencies by Solitude & ZKM

Curated by Tegan Bristow

To read the call in French please go to this link.

>>Ghosted 2018<<

Through colonialism and apartheid, many African cultures were denied participation in the progress of media technologies. Scientific colonialism ensured access to natural resources (the fuel modernism) and the labelling of African cultures as stagnant and stuck in time. These cultures where essentially »ghosted» in time. On this, Delinda Collier states:

»In the case of colonialism in Africa, the ghosting of indigenous media practices was not an unfortunate consequence of colonial rule, as most scholars of the time understood it, but rather an intentional divestment of indigenous populations of power by participation.

The now common knowledge that Europe created the notion of Africa as practicing unchanging traditions – amounted to the limited definition of »medium« in Africa to that of objects and performances as emblems of superstitious practices. (online, 2013)«

Collier uses a part of this argument to identify how in contemporary cultural practices, the histories of technological media are in fact colonial histories, which start to include a power of participation by African’s only much much later. Collier further highlights that »medium« in this frame takes on a slightly altered approach.

My focus in this call, however, expands on the first line of thinking – fast forwarded to 2018.

This is a call for unpacking the place and role of internet culture and the globalized information economy in line with neocolonialism:

What are the consequences of Western technologies on non-Western cultures?

What are scientific or technological colonialisms in 2018?

The term the »digital divide« in the 1990s was about the divide between how nations either did or did not have access to internet connectivity or digital hardware. In 2018 the »digital divide« is no longer about this; it is now about the ability to attain meaningful use from the internet and a globalized information society.

Neil Selwyn states, »[Meaningful] use should be considered to be useful, fruitful, significant and have relevance to the individual,« (Neil Selwyn, 2014) focusing on what an individual can gain not only economically, but also from social and cultural meaning (Ibid.) in this digitized world.

If we unpack these terms: economic capital is not only about access to resources, but furthermore – patterns of use, as economic divisions lead to particular patterns of use when accessing content online. In extension when we explore the role of social or cultural capital, we start seeing how people are influenced by a techno-culture socialization.

This techno-culture socialization is understood (Ibid.) to be linked to obligations and connections of particular networks and the informational power dynamic that exist between cultures, languages, and systems – and content they hold over others.

 

From a nonwestern perspective, engaging meaningful use means engaging and growing networks that don’t emanate from the West, but rather support content and narratives that focus on Southern social and cultural capital.

There is an increasing need in nonwestern cultures for internet use to be intertwined with the importance of self-determination and decolonial thinking. A position evolving from the African continent – but true for many cultures and their development in the presence as non-western knowledges. I therefore ask:

Where are the transformational archives of the South; bringing ghosted cultures to the fore?

Where are the break-up letters for the Western digital world?

The call is addressed to artists, hackers, visual and audio makers, subaltern archivists and southern healers. This call is for creative and artistic practices on non-Western explorations of cultural capital – or the effects of Western cultural capital – via personal or community archives, web performances, web sculpture and various forms of Net art and online interactions that explore meaningful transformation, self-determination, and decolonization, that may include break-up letters.

Text and image by Tegan Bristow

Format
Personal or community archives, web performances, web sculpture and various forms of Net art and online interactions. All types of work are accepted: websites, videos, writing, 3-D objects, music, or applications. If specific software or environments are needed, please contact us in advance.

Application
Submit your project proposal in the form of:
– a headline
– a concept text in English (1,000–1,500 characters with spaces)
– a header image (high resolution, landscape format)
– a short bio in English (500 characters with spaces)
– a portfolio PDF (images, text, links)

Grant
For each call, the curator selects four project proposals, whose creators are rewarded with a four-week residency and 500 USD.

Timeline
Call release: February 21
Applications: until March 26 (midnight)
Jury selection: March 26–31
Web Residencies: April 9 – May 6

Juror
Dr. Tegan Bristow is a Johannesburg based South African artist and developer of interactive digital installations; Senior Lecturer at the University of the Witwatersrand and Director of the Fak’ugesi African Digital Innovation Festival since 2016. In 2017 Bristow completed PhD on Decoloniality and Actional Methodologies in Art and Cultural Practices in African Cultures of Technology, which she wrote with the Planetary Collegium at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Arts at Plymouth University in the U.K. In 2015 curated the Post African Futures (http://postafricanfutures.net ) exhibition with the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg, in extension of this research. www.teganbristow.co.za for more detail.

Web Residencies

The »Web Residencies« were launched in 2016 by theAkademie Schloss Solitude with the aim of encouraging young talents on the international digital scene and artists from all disciplines dealing with web-based practices. ZKM has been program partner since 2017.
For each call, the curator selects four project proposals, whose creators are rewarded with a four-week residency and 500 USD.

The Web Residencies focus not on the finished art piece, but rather on process. Artists are invited to experiment with digital technologies and new art forms on the surface of digital art and communication, and reflect on the topics set by the curators.

Web Residencies are carried out exclusively online, and the works will be presented on schloss-post.com and web-residencies.zkm.de.

Artists and students of all disciplines as well as former or current Solitude fellows may apply. There is no age limit.

Learn more about the program.

Submit your content under this link. The deadline is March 26 2018 (midnight)

Rave Scholarships support training for curators, restorers, museum technicians and cultural managers from countries in transition & developing countries

Rave Scholarships support further practical training for young curators, restorers, museum technicians and cultural managers from countries in transition and developing countries who have arranged a guest period, a practical training or non-paid work at a museum, at a non-commercial gallery or at a non-commercial cultural institution in Germany.

The Rave Scholarship is a working scholarship and requires the holder’s presence. It includes the following payments:

  • a monthly lump sum of 1,300 € for a scholarship period of three to six months
  • travelling expenses (to and from Germany)
  • health insurance

The application date is 30 July each year. Selections will be made within 3 months.

Conditions

Scholarships will be awarded to applicants

  • who come from a transformation or developing country and are still living there,
  • who did not have the opportunity yet to come for a longer stay or did not have further training or working stay in Germany,
  • who finished their professional training not longer than five years ago and are not yet over 40. Those still studying or training at the time of application will not be considered for selection,
  • who have found a non-commercial partner institution in Germany that has agreed to take care of them or agreed to a joint project,
  • who can provide a positive statement from their own country (reference),
  • Knowledge of one of the three languages German, English or French is a requirement.

Applicants who were rejected once cannot apply again.

Apply

https://www.ifa.de/en/visual-arts/art-funding/rave-scholarships.html

Digital Freedom Fund

The Digital Freedom Fund supports strategic litigation on digital rights in Europe through two main activities: 
 
  • Providing financial support for strategic court cases; and 
  • Facilitating collaboration between digital rights actors. 
Where needed, the Fund also assists digital rights actors in finding pro bono legal support to further strengthen their litigation work.
Starting in Q2 2018.

Read more

Reporters in the Field

Who can participate:

  • International teams with professional freelance or staff journalists, photographers or visual storytellers who work for established media outlets (no matter if print, photo, broadcast, web, or cross-media) are eligible. No age limit applies.
  • Your team and story must be based in at least two of the following countries:
  • Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Greece, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine and United Kingdom.

WHAT it is about:

  • Find a topic that works for cross-border journalism and is of relevance in Europe.
  • Team up with international colleagues or contact us: if you have a convincing story but no team yet, we can help you to find one if you ask us in due time.
  • Realize your story: You can use our grant to support both travel costs and remuneration. To connect expertise from different countries and spheres, you can spend it on research trips with your team. If you find that your topic requires research at home, team members can also spend grant money for research in their home countries.
  • Publish your story in your preferred language.

HOW to apply:

  • Team up with your colleagues and designate a project leader, who will act as your representative for all correspondence, administrative and budgetary purposes.
  • Prepare your application in English using our application form. You can save your application before submitting it. Applications made via e-mail or post will not be considered and cannot be returned. The next deadline for applications will be March 25, 2018.
  • Submit one joint application for your team, but do include CVs and further information on the individual team members.
  • Save the Date: At least two team members must participate in our workshop in Berlin from June 15- 17, 2018.

OUR EXPECTATIONS:

The program’s main goal is to enable relevant and innovative cross-border stories. This is difficult enough, so we don’t set up many conditions. However, our expectations are:

  • Workshop: At least two team members must participate in our workshop from June 15- 17, 2018. We think that collaborative cross-border journalism is a crucial way to foster international understanding and to face current challenges in media and society. That’s why we invite everybody to a common workshop in the start. We find it equally important that you meet your team members throughout your research and share your experience with other teams – wherever possible.
  • Language: Please note that the program and the workshops are run in English, and you need an advanced level of spoken and written English to participate. Whilst we expect the completed projects to be produced in the language of your chosen media, you will be required to submit English abstracts and translations for the workshops and the program in general.
  • Publication: Please submit a publications-strategy to your application. Written commitments by media outlets, which are interested in publishing the results of your research are not obligatory but welcome and do improve your chances. You can publish your story in your preferred language but a short English summary will be required on your final results at the end.
  • Financial Report: Your grant can be used for all research related costs, but keep in mind that we need a report on your expenditures. The maximum grant available is 8,000 € per single project, which should support but not necessarily completely cover the costs of your research activities.

TIMELINE:

  • Spring 2018: Jury session and notification of the applicants
  • Pre-research phase, where teams prepare and begin their research to be able to present the first results during the first workshop.
  • June 15- 17, 2018: First workshop, where teams meet up with invited experts to discuss ideas, work on story angles and plan a road-map forward. All costs will be covered by the program. Do not include them in your budget plan.
  • June 2018- November 2018: Mentoring and research phase, where the participants return to their home destinations and/or undertake their research trips to collect information for their cross-border stories. Our fellows are offered mentoring by the program office and experts during their work.
  • End of November 2018: (optional) Two-days-review session where representatives of all teams meet again to finalize their pieces and discuss them with the new fellows of the next round.
  • End of December 2018: Last date of publishing stories – of course you can publish your stories before!

Apply

http://n-ost.org/77-reporters-in-the-field#Become%20a%20Fellow

Mozilla Research Grants

Mozilla is dedicated to keeping the web open, healthy, and accessible to everyone. As part of that mission, they provide research grants to universities, labs and research-focused registered non-profits working to make the internet a better place.

Research Domains

We fund research in a wide variety of ways, including building new technologies, improving existing technologies, and studying how people use technology. Our research domains include Emerging Technologies’ four core areas:

  • Open Web Platform, such as Rust, Servo and Daala. We recently funded projects testing the Rust and bindgen compilers, and implementing Typed WebAssembly.
  • Mixed Reality, including virtual reality and augmented reality. In 2017 we funded a study into gender differences in virtual reality, and another exploring how to design pro-social norms in VR.
  • Speech, Language & Assistants: recent funded research includes improvements to word2vec; aiding the creation of a corpus of human-chatbot interaction open data; and mining translations from existing webpages.
  • New Explorations: We have funded proposals to design more usable IoT access controls; family use of IoT; and building distributed computing in remote islands

We also fund research relevant to Mozilla in other ways:

  • Firefox: We funded a study to understand how users think Private Browsing modes work and how they actually work, as well as a study exploring older adults’ use of the internet.
  • Internet Health: Funded proposals have included studies of the ethics of hacktivism and evaluating add-ons to understand their privacy implications.
  • Accessibility: We have funded the creation of a corpus of unambiguous data for evaluating text entry for blind users, as well as tools to improve privacy and accessibility of web extensions.
  • Inclusion: We believe in the value of inclusive innovation and impact, continuously exploring new possibilities with and for diverse communities, and have funded projects that include studying ways to ameliorate harassment in streaming video and encouraging computer science education for youth.

In addition, we’re always interested in projects that explore answers to difficult questions impacting the open web, such as:

  • Developing open data resources and allowing for data portability
  • Exploring reasonable ways to balance advertising and privacy
  • Improving web anonymity
  • Developing open identity solutions and open standards for encrypted messaging
  • Researching alternatives to advertising to fund internet experiences
  • Finding ways to improve the decentralization of the internet away from closed-source software and closed-source data
  • Exploring issues related to vulnerable populations, and improving diversity in open-source software

For more detail, here are the previous funding announcements:

While we do fund a wide variety of domains, this program is for funding research.

Submitting a Funding Request

UPDATE: Submissions for 2017H2 are now closed. We will announce the 2018H1 program in Spring 2018. To be notified about these or related opportunities for collaboration or funding, join this mailing list.

Applications must be affiliated with a university, research institute or research-focused registered non-profit, in any country (except for those embargoed by the US State Department). University-affiliated applicants can be students or faculty; students will require a letter from their advisor. We encourage the submission of small, focused proposals, and we expect the timescale for most projects, not counting final publications, will be around one year. In general, we cap individual grants at $50,000. As part of our commitment to diversity, we will fund childcare up to 10% of a grant, with a cap of $5000, not counted as part of the $50,000 cap. We particularly encourage applications from new faculty in their first or second years. Funding is given as an unrestricted gift to the institution. We do not pay university overhead.

Proposals must include a plan for disseminating the results, which would normally include publication in a peer-reviewed and open-access venue, and we encourage you to make any resulting publications, results, code, and/or data publicly accessible. We will pay open-access fees for not-for-profit publishers included in your budget. In the interests of transparency, we ask you to acknowledge Mozilla’s support in your publication, and send it to us when it gets published. We particularly encourage grant recipients to further publish their work in a format more accessible to the public, like blog posts or articles in the popular press.

Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa

OSIEA plays an active role in encouraging open, informed dialogue on issues of importance in Eastern Africa. Through a combination of grant making, advocacy and convening power, OSIEA is able to support and amplify the voices of pro-democracy organizations and individuals in the region and to strengthen their capacity to hold their governments accountable. This includes efforts to defend and support rights activists and pro-democracy advocates who come under attack for their work.

OSIEA occupies a unique niche as a donor organization in Eastern Africa. We are both a donor and implementor working locally and internationally, which gives us an enormous flexibility in terms of reach and impact.  We join processes that are consultative and participatory. Our ability to be flexible in our funding criteria allows us to respond quickly to changing situations. We add our own voice to debates and are not shy to take on rights issues that are deemed as politically sensitive or controversial.

We support initiatives with a demonstrated capacity to positively transform society in innovative ways that embrace inclusiveness and diversity.

Eligibility Criteria

OSIEA supports projects in the following programmatic areas:

  • Democratic governance and rule of law

  • Economic governance

  • Health and rights

  • Equality and non-discrimination

Grant seekers should carefully review our program priorities on our webpage to better know what we fund under each of the focus areas.

Ineligibility Criteria

The Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa does not fund travel to attend conferences, seminars or workshops.

We also do not provide scholarships for individual studies.

Guidelines

Grant application PDF

Please submit proposals to info@osiea.org.

Guerilla foundation grants for societal transformations

True to THEIR name, the Guerrilla Foundation helps activists & grassroots movements build pockets of resistance, that will contribute to larger societal transformations toward a living, circular economy with a deeply democratic society that prioritises social & ecological wellbeing.

Programme Objectives and Focus Areas

While the Movement & Backbone objectives, focus on our core grant-making activities, the Voice objective is more directed at how and what we communicate as well as the overall radical, systemic change narrative we want to help bring about.

1. THE MOVEMENT – Fund for Grassroots Movements

  • Fund bold campaigns that mobilise individuals through creative means.
  • Fund movement organisations and activists that are central in tackling big issues and have a systemic change perspective.
  • Via two closed calls per year, one in spring and one in autumn.

2.  THE BACKBONE – Fund for Activism Structures

  • Support organisations and activities that educate & build capacity for community organisation and mobilisation, develop skills and thus boost credibility of activists, collectives or associations (e.g. online infrastructure, educational programs).
  • Support activist platforms  and  effective ways for activists/citizens/stakeholders to connect and organize.
  • Fund organisations that help create stronger connections between grassroots and top-tier change efforts (e.g. lobbying etc.) to increase the legitimacy of the latter.
  • Via two closed calls per year, one in spring and one in autumn.

3. THE REFLEX – ‘Go Guerrilla’ Fund for Urgent Actions

  • Respond to the need for urgent mobilisation and actions (e.g. protests) that react swiftly to emerging and unexpected sociopolitical situations and emergencies affecting activists.
  • Cover immediate needs of activists (e.g. legal support, meeting/convening costs, mobilisation costs).
  • Grants up to 5,000 EUR
  • Ongoing, year-round. Contact us at hello@guerrillafoundation.org and we’ll get the ball rolling.

4. THE VOICE – Mission for Re-articulating Distorted Narratives

  • Promote the idea and practice of grassroots mobilisation and coordinated pan-European collective action.
  • Move past narrow theories of change that are unsuitable for systemic change efforts. Our impact definition acknowledges and promotes the role of movements in shaping values and cultural narratives.
  • Share data, publish failures & not overstate impact to stop perpetuating unrealistic narratives and false expectations to advance the sector pragmatically.
  • Develop and promote good practices for effective philanthropy to educate & inspire the next generation of progressive, engaged grant-makers.

Target Groups

  • Grassroots organisations that organise and mobilise individuals, particularly those from marginalised backgrounds.
  • Movement organisations with a collaborative pan-European orientation particularly those that are addressing relevant issues from a systemic perspective.
  • Individual activists that are central to a specific movement and want to implement a relevant project beyond organisational borders.
  • Organisations and projects that provide structures for learning, communicating, organising & mobilising – online and offline.

What we are NOT Funding

  • Primarily artistic or academic projects (even if they relate to social movements / activism).
  • For-profit efforts.
  • Religious organisations and political parties.
  • Re-granting organisations.
  • Government programmes.

Selection Criteria

In the first step of the selection process, the Guerrilla Foundation team will seek out relevant organisations that work on issues that interest us and are currently important. These are the criteria that they will use (for both the Closed Calls and Urgent Action Fund) to differentiate between these relevant organisations:

Systemic Perspective – Is the project addressing root causes? Is it working towards systemic change, moving away from the symptomatic approach to a more holistic framework? Sustained action on achieving a core mission as opposed to one-off activities.

Catalytic – Bold and promising early stage initiatives. And/or initiatives that have a tough time finding funds elsewhere. How important is what we have to offer for this organisation?

Embodiment of Progressive Values  Does the organisation promote and embody the progressive values of equity, fairness, non-violence, democracy, and sustainability?

Absorption Potential – Financial & management ability, size of grant in relation to overall project/programme/organisation budget, stable organisation with low turnover & capable staff.

Multiplier Effect – Is there the potential to create large impact on an issue, field or network of organisations? How effective and creative is this organisation/individual at communication of its impact, ideas etc How central and/or collaborative within the ecosystem is this organisation/individual?

Read more

http://guerrillafoundation.org/

Media Democracy Fund Fellowship

Ford/MDF Technology Exchange Matching Fund

Launched in 2015, the Ford/MDF Technology Exchange Matching Fund (TX) creates opportunities for emerging technology leaders around the world to gain experience working with civil society organizations on Internet Freedom issues.

The program identifies candidates from the applicant pool of the Ford-Mozilla Open Web Fellows programand the Ford Technology Fellows program, and matches them with US-based and international grantee organizations from the Media Democracy Fund and Ford Foundation Internet Freedom portfolios.

Supplemented by a matching grant from Ford/MDF, each selected host site creates a full-time staff position that lasts at least 12 months and provides participants with a salary, benefits, and professional development opportunities. We hope that, in some cases, these will become permanent staff positions.

The TX staffers work on a range of substantive projects at the leading edge of technology, policy, and social justice.

Read more

http://mediademocracyfund.org/matching-technology-talent-with-frontline-social-justice-organizations/ 

Edge Fund grants for long term societal change

Funding Criteria

Edge Fund supports those taking action for a just, equitable and sustainable world. We fund work that challenges abuses of power and aims to bring an end to the systems that cause injustice. This could be our economic system, our political system or any system that discriminates against people based on their identity or background (e.g. class, ability, gender, race, nationality, religion, sexuality, age or other factors).

What we fund:

  • Work that creates long-term change in society by addressing the causes of injustice and inequality.
  • Work addressing issues facing a particular community that is led by that community (e.g. a group working on issues around sex work should be led by people with direct lived experience of sex work).
  • Groups based in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England.
  • We fund small groups that struggle to get funding elsewhere, particularly if other funders might consider them to be too radical. The average income of groups we fund is around £2500. If you’ve received funding from mainstream sources, such as the Lottery or local council, or have several paid staff, we’re probably not the fund for you.
  • We fund all types of non-profit organisations, including groups that are not formally registered.
  • Groups who have a religious purpose are welcome to apply but we don’t provide financial support for any activity, initiative or project where the primary aim is to promote religion.

What we do not fund:

  • We do not fund traditional charity work that only addresses symptoms of injustice and inequality without aiming to tackle the root causes. So, for example, we would not support activities that only improve health and well-being, or relieve financial hardship and unemployment, or improve social inclusion and harmony, or conserve the environment, or advance education and training. More on charitable activity and more on change vs charity.
  • We do not fund groups with an annual income over £25,000.
  • We do not fund commercial or business activity.
  • We rarely support registered charities, community interest companies or social enterprises as they usually have more funding options than other types of groups, and do not have radical aims. If you are unsure, please get in touch to ask us if you are eligible before applying.
  • We do not support international groups or issues. Groups in the UK & RoI that are targeting a UK & RoI-based target in response to an injustice outside the UK & RoI can apply. For example, we would fund a group of environmentalists within the areas we cover, targeting an company based in the UK & RoI for their crimes abroad. We would not fund a group in a country outside the UK & RoI, targeting a company in the UK or RoI.
  • We do not support political parties.
  • We are not currently accepting applications from individuals. We suggest that you find a few like-minded people and create a group for your project.
  • We do not fund work that is in partnership with, or promotes, the military or police.
  • We do not fund the ‘service user’ groups of larger charities. These charities usually have enough access to funding.

Still unsure?

Read more

Apply here

Red Umbrella fund

What we fund

The Red Umbrella Fund provides funding to sex worker-led organisations and networks that are:

  • based in any country in the world;
  • registered or unregistered;
  • led by women, men and/or trans.

Our criteria

If you wish to apply, your group, organisation or network must fulfill each of the following three criteria:

1. Be led by sex workers for the benefit of sex workers.
2. Be committed to connect to and strengthen the sex workers’ rights movement
3. Agree with all the principles of the Red Umbrella Fund.

We do NOT fund:

  • Organisations that are not led by sex workers;
  • Organisations that have a project or programme with or for sex workers, while the organisation as a whole has a broader focus;
  • Organisations that seek to abolish or criminalise sex work;
  • Organisations exclusively providing social or medical services;
  • Organisations founded by or structurally dependent on political parties, government agencies or religious institutions;
  • Business, credit programmes or income-generating activities;
  • Academic research;
  • Individual requests.

What kind of grants do we give?

The Red Umbrella Fund provides flexible core funding to support the general coordination, functioning and strengthening of a group, organisation or network and its members. Core funding can be used to cover expenses such as registration costs, rent, salaries, advocacy, (peer led) capacity building, membership meetings, networking activities, etc. Our funding is flexible in that it may be used and adjusted largely according to self-identified needs of the grantee. Our grants are not meant solely for project-based activities.

How much funding can be requested?

The Red Umbrella Fund currently provides two-year grants of between €8.000 and €80.000. The average grant size has been about €20.000 per year. Please be realistic in your request and do not automatically request the maximum amount.

Read more

http://www.redumbrellafund.org/grantmaking/apply-grant/ 

McGraw fellowship for Business journalism

The Harold W. McGraw, Jr. Center for Business Journalism, an initiative of the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, provides editorial and financial support to journalists who need the time and resources to produce a significant story or series that provides fresh insight into an important business or economic topic. They accept applications for in-depth text, video or audio pieces, and we encourage proposals that take advantage of more than one storytelling form to create a multimedia package.

Typically, they award grants up to $5,000 a month for one to three months; in exceptional cases, we’ll consider longer grants based upon specific proposals. We’ll look for applicants with a proven ability to report and execute a complex project in their proposed medium; ideally, candidates will also have a strong background or reporting expertise on the subject of their piece.

Applications will generally be accepted twice a year — in the summer and late fall. The upcoming deadline is December 15, 2017. (Please note this has changed from the original date of Nov. 30, 2017.) Summer applications will be due June 30, 2018.

Read more

The McGraw Business Journalism Fellowship

Digital Integrity Fellowship Program by OTF

The Digital Integrity Fellowship Program (DIFP) provides fixed monthly stipends to individuals capable of addressing short-term and long-term threats to freedom of expression online. Fellows provide organizations and communities most affected by internet freedom violations (like journalists, human rights defenders, NGOs, activists, bloggers, and others) comprehensive internal support with their digital security expertise. Simultaneously, Fellows will educate the broader internet freedom field about the threats and vulnerabilities experienced, to ensure that emerging and existing technologies best meet the needs of at-risk communities.
Next deadline: December 30th 2017

More information

孔子新汉学计划 CONFUCIUS CHINA STUDIES PROGRAM

Hanban supports graduate research and Ph.D. programs,  furthermore financianl help can be granted for conferences and publications.

There are six stipend categories. The deadline for Ph.D. programs is every year at the end of January.

Homepage “Confucius China Studies Program”

Contact: ccsp@hanban.org

电话:+86 10 58595756

传真:+86 10 58595762

  1. 中外合作培养博士项目 Joint Research Ph.D. Fellowship

Support doctoral students (candidates) registered with foreign universities to come to China for study, research and writing of their doctoral dissertations.

Duration: From six months to two years.

Funding

  • Lodging and living stipend: 80,000 RMB per year
  • Research fund: 20,000 RMB per year
  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Tuition;
  • Other support provided by the host Chinese university
  • Expenses for the foreign supervisor’s visit or research in China
  • Expenses for life and medical insurances in China
  • Group activities and cultural experience

 

further details

  1. 来华攻读博士学位项目 Ph.D. in China Fellowship

Support foreign students to pursue full-time Ph.D. degrees in the humanities and social sciences at Chinese universities.

Funding

  • Lodging and living stipend: 80,000 RMB per year;
  • Research fund: 20,000 RMB per year
  • Round-trip international airfare;
  • Tuition;
  • Other support provided by the host Chinese university;
  • Expenses for life and medical insurances in China.
  • Group activities and cultural experience.

 

further details

  1. 理解中国访问学者项目 Understanding China Fellowship

This fellowship consists of the following three categories:

  • 1. “Understanding China” Visiting Scholar to China >> details
  • 2. “Understanding China” Short-term visit >> details
  • 3. “Understanding China” Chinese Visiting Scholar >> details
  1. 青年领袖项目 Young Leaders Fellowship

Support outstanding youths who have been awarded at least a Bachelor’s Degree and hold a certain position in the field of politics, economics, finance, law, education, culture, arts, and media to visit China;

Duration: From two weeks to six months.

Funding

  • Accommodation and travel expenses in China;
  • Round-trip international airfare (economy class, to be reimbursed against actual cost);
  • Expenses for life and medical insurances in China.

 

further details

  1. 出版资助项目 Publication Grant

Publication Grant supports foreign scholars to publish or translate relevant monographs, doctoral dissertations, or founding relevant academic journals on Sinology and/or China Studies.

The leading applicant must be non-Chinese citizen, and the book will be published in other countries and areas than P.R.China.

The grant covers expenses for editing, translation, publication, circulation and advertising. The exact expenses will be approved according to the application.

 

further details

  1. 国际会议项目 International Conference Grant

The International Conference Grant is aimed at supporting Confucius Institutes, universities, research institutes, and scholars to hold or attend international academic conferences on Sinology and/or China Studies.

Funding

  • The accommodation and travel expenses of conference speakers;
  • Registration fees;
  • Publication fees of conference proceedings.

 

further details

Amplify Change Strengthening Grant

Strengthening grants support particular, usually time-limited, projects (usually 6-24 months) that seek to engage and contribute to bringing about change in one or more of the priority themes of AmplifyChange.

Strengthening grants range from EUR40,000 – EUR100,000.

We receive strong competition for Strengthening grants. Therefore, we encourage applicants to provide realistic budgets to match their proposed approach, and not just apply for the maximum amount available.

We will not consider grants exceeding EUR100,000 in budget.

There may be a possibility of extending the period of support. This will be advised at a later date to successful applicants, and will be subject to performance.   

Who and what are Strengthening grants for?

Strengthening grants are intended to do what their name suggests – to support and strengthen the work of small to medium civil society organisations, partnerships and coalitions who are operating at a local, community, district or national level.

Strengthening grants are also intended to help strengthen the organisational and technical capacity of groups; we understand that this enables groups to better implement projects that are aiming to secure specific change.  

See eligible countries.

What was the last Strengthening grant call for?

The last Strengthening grant call focused on supporting the advocacy efforts of civil society organisations seeking to bring about positive policy and reform in AmplifyChange priority thematic areas.  

We can provide support to cover costs related to:
  • Implementing specific activities in line with one or more of the AmplifyChange thematic areas
  • Staff costs including support staff
  • Technical assistance costs
  • Travel costs associated with the project objectives and activities
  • Organisational capacity building and strengthening support including staff training and development
  • Activity Monitoring & Evaluation costs
  • Indirect project support costs. These are expenses which are incurred in the support of operational activities including, for example, rent, shared utility costs and audit fees.

Read more & Apply

https://amplifychange.org/grant-model/strengthening/how-to-apply/