Tor Summer of Privacy

Back in 2014, the Torproject ran Tor Summer of Privacy, a chance for developers to contribute code and help make Tor even stronger. Each coder was paired a core Tor developer who mentored them, provided guidance and encouragement, and helped with rubber-duck debugging.

This year, in order to encourage developers to contribute to the world’s strongest privacy tool, the Torproject is running Summer of Privacy again! The program is open to anyone, but the mentorship opportunities make it an especially good fit for students. After our Outreachy internships, this is the second paid opportunity to get involved with Tor so far this year.

Use Your Skills 

The Torproject has a handful of projects in mind for this year. The volunteer page has full details — there are projects covering almost every part of Tor, from creating a Tor client in Python to stripping metadata from file uploads in Tor Browser. If none of these projects jump out at you — get in touch and propose your own! If your project idea is accepted, the Torproject will mentor you and help bring it to life.

Tor’s Summer of Privacy program matches Google’s Summer of Code student stipends.

Applying

Applying for the Tor Summer of Privacy is as easy as sending a project proposal to the Summer of Privacy mailing list. If you’re looking for an idea of what proposals should look like, see these examples of GSOC projects from previous years.  The application phase officially begins on March 12th and ends on March 26th. The Torproject will announce the successful applications on April 20th.

Read original post on Torproject’s blog.

FRIDA Young Feminist Fund

Applications for 2018 are open until March 18th 2018

You can apply for a grant up to $5,000 USD. Grant money is flexible, it can be used over a period of 12 months for general support and/or projects, and are open to renewal.

You do not need to be a legally registered organization to apply.

Priority will be given to:

  • Small, emerging grassroots groups with little or no access to funding from larger donors
  • Groups, networks, or collectives based in Sub Saharan Africa, South, Southeast, East Asia and the Pacific, The Middle East and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean and Central, Southern, Eastern Europe and Central and North Asia)
  • Groups located in remote, underserved areas
  • Groups that are made up of and/or working with socially excluded and disadvantaged young women, trans* and intersex youth, especially: refugees, ethnic, national and caste minorities, rural women, urban disadvantaged, lesbian, bisexual, trans*, women and trans* living with HIV and AIDS, sex workers, women and trans* with disabilities, women and trans* living or working in armed conflicts and post conflict zones, women and trans lead unions, groups working on climate justice, land rights
  • Groups using creative and innovative strategies to further their activism (including art, music, culture, poetry, social media, feminist activist driven research etc

Application Process

Digital Freedom Fund

The Digital Freedom Fund supports strategic litigation on digital rights in Europe through two main activities: 
 
  • Providing financial support for strategic court cases; and 
  • Facilitating collaboration between digital rights actors. 
Where needed, the Fund also assists digital rights actors in finding pro bono legal support to further strengthen their litigation work.
Starting in Q2 2018.

Read more

Red Umbrella fund

What we fund

The Red Umbrella Fund provides funding to sex worker-led organisations and networks that are:

  • based in any country in the world;
  • registered or unregistered;
  • led by women, men and/or trans.

Our criteria

If you wish to apply, your group, organisation or network must fulfill each of the following three criteria:

1. Be led by sex workers for the benefit of sex workers.
2. Be committed to connect to and strengthen the sex workers’ rights movement
3. Agree with all the principles of the Red Umbrella Fund.

We do NOT fund:

  • Organisations that are not led by sex workers;
  • Organisations that have a project or programme with or for sex workers, while the organisation as a whole has a broader focus;
  • Organisations that seek to abolish or criminalise sex work;
  • Organisations exclusively providing social or medical services;
  • Organisations founded by or structurally dependent on political parties, government agencies or religious institutions;
  • Business, credit programmes or income-generating activities;
  • Academic research;
  • Individual requests.

What kind of grants do we give?

The Red Umbrella Fund provides flexible core funding to support the general coordination, functioning and strengthening of a group, organisation or network and its members. Core funding can be used to cover expenses such as registration costs, rent, salaries, advocacy, (peer led) capacity building, membership meetings, networking activities, etc. Our funding is flexible in that it may be used and adjusted largely according to self-identified needs of the grantee. Our grants are not meant solely for project-based activities.

How much funding can be requested?

The Red Umbrella Fund currently provides two-year grants of between €8.000 and €80.000. The average grant size has been about €20.000 per year. Please be realistic in your request and do not automatically request the maximum amount.

Read more

http://www.redumbrellafund.org/grantmaking/apply-grant/ 

Lush Charity Pot

The Lush Charity Pot supports small, grassroots organisations around the world that are working in the areas of animal protection, the environment , and human rights. The majority of our funding is allocated to smaller groups who struggle to find funding elsewhere.

All applications within these fields will be considered irrespective of their geographical location or how the organisation is registered. For a full version of these guidelines, please go to https://uk.lush.com/article/lush-charity-pot-uk-full-guidelines.​ Please read these before downloading the application form.

How much can I apply for?

Our support ranges from a few hundred pounds to a maximum of £10,000 per project. Our average grant is around £4,000.

What projects are funded?

Lush Charity Pot particularly looks for projects that create long-term change. They feel it is also crucially important to fund projects that aim to stop the abuse from happening in the first place by addressing the root cause of the problem; for example, Lush Charity Pot would prefer to fund a project that aims to stop deforestation (eg by challenging the palm oil industry) over one that aims to plant trees to restore an area that’s already been deforested. Lush Charity Pot therefore prioritises funding to projects which aim to change opinion and behaviour through raising awareness of issues, activism, education and campaigning, particularly because this kind of work is not well funded elsewhere. We’re looking for initiatives that reach beyond those directly involved in the project; those that have the potential to benefit many rather than just a few individuals.

We do also fund projects that provide aid and support where needed, such as animal shelters and refugee support and advice groups. As well as challenging harmful practices it’s important to support positive alternatives. Therefore, we also look for projects that promote and implement viable, fair and sustainable solutions to the world’s problems.

Which organisations are fundable?

The majority of our funding is allocated to small, grassroots groups that are often best placed to make a real difference with limited resources and often struggle to find funding. Almost all the groups we fund have annual incomes of less than £250,000 and most are substantially smaller than this and run entirely or predominantly by volunteers. If your organisation is in the fortunate position of having many supporters and corporate sponsors or is able to secure mainstream funding such as government grants, you’re probably not one for us.

We believe we can make the most impact by funding causes that are often overlooked by other funders, therefore we give priority to less popular issues which are more difficult to raise funds for. The most popular causes tend to be health charities (medical research, hospices etc), social welfare, religious causes, children/ young people and military related causes, so these aren’t a priority for us. We’re looking for organisations that take on issues that others don’t, those that push the boundaries and challenge mainstream opinion.

We support non-violent direct action groups because we feel it plays an important part in bringing about social change. Non-violent direct action includes protests and demonstrations, non-cooperation and other non-violent interventions. We will only consider supporting non-violent direct action groups, i.e. those which have no intention of physically harming others or threatening to do so. Whilst we support groups that engage in non-violent direct action in various ways, we do not fund actions that may break the law.

We don’t fund religious organisations, schools, councils, student expeditions or academic studies neither do we contribute to sponsored walks or other fundraising initiatives or sponsor events.

Read more

https://uk.lush.com/article/charity-pot-funding-guidelines

Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists

Promoting the work and advancing the role of women in the news media across the globe is critical to transparency and a diversity of voices.

The Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists, the first funding initiative of its kind, enables the IWMF to dramatically expand its support of women journalists. Established with a $4 million gift from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, the Fund will support projects including educational opportunities, investigative reporting and media development initiatives.

Funding rounds will open for applications in January and June of each year; applications take 6-8 weeks to process. Applicants may apply for concurrently for Reporting Grants for Women’s Stories and the Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists.

Approximately $230,000 are dispersed each year. Grant sizes  depend on the proposal and the inclusion of a detailed budget.

Who

  • Women journalists from anywhere in the world are eligible to apply.
  • Applicants must identify as women.
  • Practicing journalism must be the applicants primary profession.
  • Applicants must have three or more years of post-graduate professional journalism experience.
  • Teams of journalists may apply, however the submission must be from a woman journalist and her team must include at least 50% women.
  • Special consideration will be given to freelance journalists.

What

Applicants may apply for one of two different types of funding: reporting projects or professional development opportunities.

Reporting projects include journalistic work in any media format, including but not limited to print, digital, video, photography and new media. The Fund for Women Journalists will prioritize reporting projects pitched around underreported stories of global importance.

Professional development opportunities can include security training, conferences, workshops and media development initiatives such as technical skills building trainings. We encourage skills building applicants who are pitching media development initiatives to include an element of mentorship in their proposal.

We encourage applicants to consider a one-year timeline or less for completion and publication of their project – please note the average grant size is 10,000 USD. Projects with timelines longer than one year or requesting grants over $10,000 will be considered on a limited basis.

While applicants can seek funding on any under-reported topic, in this round of funding only the IWMF has set aside a discrete pool of money for small grants that support reporting on how local communities in the United States are affected by or reacting to the flow of undocumented migrants coming from Mexico and/or Central America. Projects pitched for this opportunity need to be completed and published/produced in under a year, and have a suggested budget of no more than $5,000.

All applications must include a detailed preliminary budget and timeline.

There are certain requests that the Fund selection committee will not consider. The Fund will not provide money to cover tuition expenses for undergraduate or graduate degree programs. Requests for assistance with equipment will be considered on a limited basis.

Read more

Howard G. Buffett Fund for Women Journalists

Application guide: https://www.iwmf.org/programs/howard-g-buffett-fund-for-women-journalists/2017-grant-application-guide/

Mama Cash – Grants for feminist women and trans groups

Mama Cash supports groups and initiatives that:

  1. Work from a feminist and/or women’s rights perspective Example: A group working on women and housing puts the particular experiences of women at the core of its work and therefore is able to speak about the ways in which the barriers women face in accessing decent and affordable housing are different from the barriers men face. They also speak to the challenges of different groups of women (e.g. urban women and rural women) in accessing housing. They are able to explain how these challenges to accessing decent and affordable housing relate to the economic policies being implemented in their country.  Finally, the solutions that they propose integrate all these elements.
  2. Are self-led by the women, girls and/or trans* people they serve Example: If a group is working on trans* rights, it should be trans* people deciding about the groups’ policies, activities and how their money should be spent. The spokespersons for the group should be trans*, as well as those being paid. Non-trans* or cis people can also work for the group in different capacities providing they are not the ones leading it.
  3. Have the promotion of women’s, girls’ and/or trans* people’s human rights as their primary mission, and not just as the focus of part of their programmes Example: An organisation advocating for girls’ access to reproductive health services and whose mission states: To ensure the fulfilment of the sexual and reproductive rights of girls.
  4. Push for structural and fundamental change Example: An Indigenous women’s group provides health services to other Indigenous women in order to respond to their immediate needs in the short-term. But the group also works to tackle the fundamental barriers to accessing such services so that other Indigenous women they can’t or don’t reach can also benefit in the longer-term.
  5. Focus on issues that are under-addressed and/or contested Example: In an environment where governments and NGOs are heavily investing in addressing HIV and AIDS in women of reproductive age, a group of post-menopausal women living with HIV and AIDS organise for their rights and try to make their concerns heard when they are not considered important or urgent in their context.

Mama Cash prioritises groups and initiatives that:

Have an annual budget below 200,000 euros

Mama Cash may partner with larger groups through the Accompaniment portfolio (formerly known as our Strategic Partnerships Portfolio) but will not prioritise providing financial support to them through our thematic portfolios (Body, Money and/or Voice)

Do you want to see examples of the kind of groups Mama Cash supports? click here >>

B. Who & What does Mama Cash support?

Mama Cash makes grants in most countries of the world. Even though contexts are significantly different, we have found that the concerns of some specific groups of women, girls and trans* people tend to be unaddressed and/or contested in most societies (and social movements). So these groups are often found among our grantees.

Mama Cash focuses on three broad thematic areas – Body, Money and Voice – and supports groups whose work falls within them (for further information, see here).

For example, Mama Cash supports groups that work on:

  • Forced sterilisation of women living with HIV and AIDS
  • Exclusion of Indigenous women from decision making over their land
  • Labour rights of women and trans* people in sex, domestic or industrial work
  • Rights to water, food, and a clean, safe, and healthy environment
  • Confronting legal and social discrimination against lesbian and bisexual women, or against migrant and refugee women
  • Sexual rights of women, girls and trans* persons living with disabilities
  • Decision-making for girls and older women (65+) about their lives (education, health, relationships)
  • Political and public participation for women, girls or trans* persons from ethnic or religious minorities

This list is merely indicative. Mama Cash is open to supporting groups organising on other issues that are relevant for their context and have not been mentioned, provided they meet the criteria.

C. What Mama Cash does not fund

  1. Groups whose mission and/or primary focus are not the promotion of women’s, girls’ or trans* people’s human rights
  2. Groups whose work focuses primarily on improving the lives of individual women, girls and/or trans* people without addressing the conditions that give rise to the injustices they face
  3. Groups that actively seek to deny the rights of certain women, girls and trans* people, based on who they are or on their position in society
  4. Groups whose primary purpose is development work, humanitarian assistance, poverty alleviation, or services, such as:
  5. Income-generating activities and credit programmes, (In)formal education, literacy programmes and traditional skills training, Providing social, legal or health care services
  6. Groups led by men (with the exception of those led by trans men)
  7. Groups based in the United States or Canada
  8. Groups based in the Global North that are executing programmes in or are leading partnerships with groups based in the Global South and East
  9. Groups founded by, led by, or structurally or economically dependent on political parties, government agencies, or religious institutions
  10. Businesses
  11. Individuals
  12. Academic research or scholarships
  13. Stand-alone travel grants (costs for travel can, however, be part of broader applications provided they are consistent with the group’s mission and strategies)

Read more

http://www.mamacash.org/apply-for-a-grant-2/womens-girls-and-trans-groups/our-priorities-and-themes/

The Daimler and Benz Foundation Scholarship Program – Postdoctoral Students & Assistant Professors

The grants serve to support postdoctoral students at German research institutes, primarily assistant professors or researchers in similar positions, as, for example, self-employed heads of young academic research groups. Candidates must be in the early phases of their research career. The Foundation knowingly refuses to formulate a specific definition of “early phases” since the time period will be dependent on the academic field and can be evaluated in differing ways. Nonetheless it should be clear from the application that the applicant has consciously decided to pursue a research career and is actively pursuing this goal.

Applicants can only apply for a grant for their own research project. It can either be for an expansion of an already running research project or a completely new project.

The scholarships are awarded for two years: the yearly grant sum is €20,000. Scholarship recipients must write a report about their progress and research results after the first year and a final report once the scholarship has ended. The bursar’s office of the research institute at which the scholarship recipient is working handles the actual disbursement of the grant.

Read more

http://www.daimler-benz-stiftung.de/cms/images/dbs-bilder/nachwuchs/postdoktoranden-2018/Postdoc_Ausschreibung_englisch.pdf

Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code is a global program focused on introducing students to open source software development. Students work on a 3 month programming project with an open source organization during their break from university.

As a part of Google Summer of Code, student participants are paired with a mentor from the participating organizations, gaining exposure to real-world software development and techniques. Students have the opportunity to spend the break between their school semesters earning a stipend while working in areas related to their interests.

In turn, the participating organizations are able to identify and bring in new developers who implement new features and hopefully continue to contribute to open source even after the program is over. Most importantly, more code is created and released for the use and benefit of all.

Who

  • Students only
  • resident of a country not currently embargoed by the United States
  • minimum age 18 years old

Read more

https://summerofcode.withgoogle.com/

Core Infrastructure Initiative

The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) and its members have come together to invest in core infrastructure of the Internet, providing funding for fundamental projects like OpenSSL, OpenSSH, NTPd and others. Under the guidance of the Advisory Board, CII is actively researching and identifying new projects to improve the security of the internet. CII is particularly looking for grant proposals which meet the following criteria:

  1. CII funded projects should benefit the open source community’s ability to deliver and maintain secure code.
  2. Communication security is our most critical need; funding priority should be for projects that improve and harden critical at-risk services capabilities. Embedded, IoT, Mobile, Network, Server and Web Application are all target workloads.
  3. Practical solutions for today’s problems are a priority. Research, for example, should be prioritized towards applied topics that will impact the development community.
  4. Prefer community building projects over work for hire projects.

Read more

https://applications.coreinfrastructure.org/

Mozilla Open Source Support

Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) is Mozilla’s program for supporting the Open Source and Free Software movement, with a yearly budget of around $3 million. Mozilla was born out of and remains a part of this movement, and we prosper because of its technology and activism. And we know that open source software remains a key part of the Internet and is essential for the online life of choice, innovation and opportunity we seek to build.

Who

  • Foundational Technology

    The Foundational Technology track is open to any free software / open source project that Mozilla relies on — either embedded in our products or infrastructure, or just used to get work done.

  • Mission Partners

    The Mission Partners track is open to any free software / open source project that significantly furthers Mozilla’s mission to ensure the Internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all.

  • Secure Open Source

    The Secure Open Source (“SOS”) track supports security audits for open source software projects, and remedial work to rectify the problems found.

Read more

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/moss/

Outreachy

Outreachy helps people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software get involved. We provide a supportive community for beginning to contribute any time throughout the year and offer focused internship opportunities twice a year with a number of free software organizations.

Who

Currently, internships are open internationally to women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Additionally, they are open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander. We are planning to expand the program to more participants from underrepresented backgrounds in the future.

When

The next round of Outreachy internships will have an application deadline in October, and internship dates from early December to early March. Coding, design, documentation and other projects will be available. The applicants will be asked to select a project with one of the participating organizations and collaborate with a mentor listed for that project to make a relevant contribution to the project during the application process.

How

The accepted participants work remotely, while being guided by their mentor, and receive $5,500 stipend. It’s expected that the participants are able to have the internship work be a primary focus during the internship dates and spend 40 hours a week on it.

Read more

http://outreachy.org